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From the Principal

23.07.20

Dear Families,

I am hoping the children have come back from the ‘Winter break’ rejuvenated and ready to embrace learning and new challenges during Term Three.

Attitude counts
There are different theories, as well as examples of people who have exceeded in their chosen field, as a result of sustained hard-work, commitment and a positive approach.

It sounds quite simple: be industrious, demonstrate the right frame of mind and things should take care of themselves. As we know, it is a little more complicated than this. However, immense effort, accompanied with a growth mindset, quality feedback (that is taken on board) and an optimistic attitude is the catalyst for high-level achievement.

Amanda Gore, an author in communications and performance, discusses that people who have a 'good' attitude, take responsibility for themselves and are usually great company too. They can turn situations around and see the 'learning opportunity'; they view mistakes as learning; they choose to avoid people who drag them down; they are optimistic and expect good things to happen to them; they see the best in others.

'Poor' attitude people blame others for their circumstances. They will turn the best situation into one that is negative and to them, mistakes are massive failures.

Amanda’s research has found that people who are positive in their outlook have better health, live longer, recover from disease more quickly, are more popular and suffer less stress. Thinking in a positive or different way causes chemicals to rush through your blood and you can actually make yourself feel better chemically – you can change your mood.

One of the huge problems with having a defeatist or victim mentality, is that it radiates out of your body and other people pick up on it. This shows up in all different settings, including the home. Amanda’s advice is to stop, listen to your thoughts and images, replace them with more appropriate ones and you will notice the difference in your life. 

Sir Winston Churchill once said, ‘Attitude is a little thing that makes a big difference’. I agree with the sentiments from the former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. However, I claim that attitude is not a ‘little thing’; but rather significant.

Best wishes to Verity Rye and welcome Karina Forte
Verity Rye, our OSHC Director, commences maternity leave at the end of this week. We wish Verity much joy as she embarks upon motherhood. With Verity leaving, we cordially welcome Karina Forte to St Joseph’s as the Acting OSHC Director. Karina has worked in a variety of OSHC services over a period of time. Karina will work be working on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. On a Monday and Friday, Carissa Cristancig (who currently works in OSHC) will be the service supervisor.

New staff members
This term we also warmly welcome new staff members, Corrina Colombo, Natassia Messent and Leah Tregenza. Corinna will be supporting Maria Prestia in the Growing into Reception (GIR) classroom on Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays and help facilitate Piccolini on Thursdays and Fridays. Natassia will be in the GIR class on Thursdays and Fridays. Lastly, Leah will be assisting with Piccolini on Wednesdays and Thursdays and supporting different students on Mondays.

Term Three intake, Preschool and Growing into Reception
Our new Preschool children and Growing into Reception students have begun this week, as part of the Term Three mid-year intake. We hope they have an encouraging start. We also welcome any new families who have commenced in our community.

Playgroup and Piccolini
Playgroup is back! It will be resuming in Week 2 – on Wednesday and Friday mornings, from 9:00 until 10:30am, in Preschool Room 1. Maria Lupoi will lead Playgroup on Wednesday and Manuela Ciniglia on Fridays. 

Piccolini (our Occasional Care three/four-year old program) is also continuing, but in the Multipurpose Room, on Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from 8:45am until 11:45am. Carissa Cristancig, Corrina Colombo and Leah Tregenza will be coordinating the Piccolini program. Please book through the Front Office.

Financial hardship
If you are experiencing significant financial loss due to COVID-19, or for other reasons, please contact the school’s Finance Officer, Helen Crosato – hcrosato@stjopayn.catholic.edu.au

Safety around school
Whilst there haven’t been any reports about people acting suspiciously towards any of our students; if you haven’t had a recent conversation with your child about actions should your child ever be approached by a stranger (especially when they are unaccompanied or travelling to and from school), then it is recommended this takes place.

South Australia Police advise that if students are approached, they should not respond and not accept offers of rides or gifts. Students should seek the assistance of other nearby adults if they feel unsafe and should report the event to a trusted adult (parent or school staff member) as soon as possible.

Students with Disability Review – Survey
The South Australian Commission for Catholic Schools (SACCS) has established a Students with Disability Review of Catholic Education South Australia’s policies, procedures and support arrangements for students with disability. The purpose of the Review is to identify how Catholic Education can strengthen the inclusion, learning and wellbeing of students with disability.

If you are interested in finding out more information and/or completing the survey, please visit the following site: www.cesa.catholic.edu.au/SWDReview  

COVID-19 prompts and reminders
Whilst in South Australia restrictions have eased, certain directives for schools remain. For us at St Joseph’s Payneham this means: 

  • continuing to endorse and engage in good personal hygienic practices;
  • any student (and family member) who is unwell, should not attend school and seek medical advice;
  • entering the school site for ‘drop-off’ and ‘pick-up’ is fine, however we ask that you please leave as soon as it is practical to do so;
  • parents/carers not to enter classrooms whilst students are present (unless it is very necessary); and
  • the promotion for adults to continue practicing physical distancing.

Thanking you for your support.

Wishing you well!
Simon Mechis